CORNMARKET, OXFORD

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36 Cornmarket Street: Itsu (former Northgate Tavern)


36 Cornmarket

This building is in the parish of St Michael-at-the-Northgate Church.

Original building on this site

For leases on the former property on this site granted by Oxford City Council from 1606 to1674, see Salter, Oxford City Properties, pp. 241–243. After that date it was united with the Bocardo prison and became the residence of the gaoler.

There was a pub on this site from the eighteenth century:

  • Granby’s Head in 1794
  • Marquis of Granby by 1842.
  • Leopold Arms by 1880.
Present building

In about 1905 No. 36 was rebuilt as two properties, with a pub (the North Gate Tavern) on the left at No. 36, and a shop on the right at No. 36A..

The Northgate Tavern closed on 22 November 1971.

By 1998 the two shops had been converted into one.

Occupants of 36 Cornmarket Street listed in directories etc.

Date

No. 36 (left)

No. 36A (right)

1839–1872

Granby’s Head or Marquis of Granby

Landlords (not subject to 19C university wine licence):

Thomas Peake (1794)
Ann Ward (1823)
Elizabeth Ward (1830)
R. Castle (1839)
John Brightwell (1841–1846)
Frederick Lipscomb (1850–1852)
Thomas Goodger (1861–1867)
Richard Tymms (1872)

1880–1907

Leopold Arms

Landlords:

Mrs Hebborn (1880)
Charles Lovelock (1881)
Charles Spier (1884–1890)
Henry Tayler or Taylor (1895–1899)
Thomas William Morgan (1901–1905)

William Swell (1907)

1909

Northgate Tavern

c.1910

Rebuilt as a pub and a shop

1911–1921

Northgate Tavern or Hotel

Some Landlords:

George R. Boreham (1911–1925)
Percy W. Chapman (1928–1956)

Rudge-Whitworth Ltd.
Cycle & motor cycle makers & engineers

1928–1947

Millets (Broughton) Ltd, Clothiers

E. G. Milletts & Co., Clothiers

1952–1969

Oxford & District Co-operative Society
(also next door at 35)

This part of the shop is described as
“Sports Outfitters” from 1952

It was separate from 35 until 1964, when the
two shops together were“Sports outfitters,
toys, prams; and from 1966 they were
“Jewellers, outfitters, toys”

1970–1971

Music Centre Record Dealers

1972

Vacant (the pub probably being altered into a shop)

1973–1980

Martin Ford Ltd

Harlequin Record Shop

1981

Our Price Records

1986

1988

Jean Jeanie

1993

West World Leather

1996

Jean Factory

 

1998–2013

The Works remainder books

2013–present

Itsu

Former pub at 36 Cornmarket Street in the censuses

1841

John Brightwell (30), victualler, lived here at this (unnamed) pub with Jane (25) and Charles (twelve months) and Eliza and Bryan Brightwell (both 15). There are three male servants and another boy of 15 in the household.

1851

Frederic Lipscomb (39), a widowed publican, lived here at this (unnamed) pub with his schoolboy son Frederic (10) and an ostler.

1861

Thomas Goodger (55), publican, lived here at the Granby’s Head with his wife Sarah (57) and their granddaughter Sarah Jane (10): all three were born in Leicestershire. A sawyer was lodging with them.

1871

Richard Coles (35), a jointer, lived here at the Marquis of Granby with his wife Harriet (35) and their children Ernest (11), Edgar (9), Arthur (7), Albert (2), and Harry (six months).
There was also a second household here comprising Richard Symm (39), a musician, his wife Martha (39), and their children Richard (13), Clara (11), Alice (9), Albert (7), Christopher (5), Henrietta (3), and E. Maud (2).

1881

Charles Lovelock (49), inn keeper, lived here at the Leopold Arms with his wife Emma (47) and daughters Mary (22) and Juley (eleven months). They had one servant (a cook).

1891

Charles Spier (35), licensed victualler, lived here at the Leopold Arms with his wife Mary Ann (35) and their daughter Edith (6).

1901

Thomas W. Morgan (36), taverner & blacksmith, lived here at the Leopold Arms with his wife Sarah (36) and his children Albert (8) and Lilian (5). They had a 17-year-old servant girl.

Rebuilt in c.1905
1911

George Richard Boreham (38), licensed victualler, lived here at the Northgate Tavern in six rooms with his wife Agnes (38) and their son Sydney (8). They had one servant, and a music-hall artiste called Fred Maitland was staying with them

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