HOLYWELL, OXFORD

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Bath Place (between 55 and 56 Holywell Street)


Bath Place, off Holywell

Bath Place, 1876

 

Photographs of Bath Place by Henry Taunt

The southern part of the passage (which is in St Peter-in-the-East parish and includes the Turf Tavern) is a separate lane now known as St Helen’s Passage. The map on the right shows the seven houses of Bath Place in 1876, with the row of houses to the south being in St Helen's passage

In the 1772 Survey of Oxford, however, the passage from Holywell Street is listed simply as “Hell”. The width of its entrance is given as 4 yards 0ft 2in, and it is described as being in the occupation of “Mrs Billing & others”.

There was also a Bath Place in St Clement's.

Bath Place was painted by J. A. Shuffrey in c.1907 (OXCMS: 2002.74,13, pictured on p. 42 of Lauren Gilmour and Margaret Shuffrey, J. A. Shuffrey 1859–1939: An Oxford Artist’s Life Remembered).

All the houses in Bath Place (including the Bath Place Hotel and the Turf Tavern) are now owned by Merton College.

All seven houses in Bath Place are Grade II listed, and their list entry describes them as follows:

  • 1 Bath Place (west side): 1299843
    House Possibly C17 in origin and altered in C18. Two storeys. Plastered timber-framing. Brick stack. C18 windows, those on the ground floor with shutters. Photograph
  • 2 & 3 Bath Place (east side): 1369322
    Two houses, one building. C17 in origin but the front altered in C18. 3-storeyed roughcast, partly timber framed and partly stone. The West front has a gable at the South end and in front of this is a C18 boxed-out projection running up the height of the house. At the North end is a similar boxed-out bay. Modern brown tile roof. Some original three-light C18 windows, those on the ground floor having been converted to casements. At the back in a Welsh slate roof is a gabled attic dormer. Photograph
  • 4 Bath Place (east side): 1185039
    House. Possibly C17 in origin but much altered. Two-storeyed brick and timber-framed roughcast. Brick stacks. Three C18 sash windows kin 1st floor; the ground floor is boxed-out. Photograph
  • 5 Bath Place (east side): 1047371
    House. Date of original building indeterminate but altered in C18. Two storeys, partly rubble and roughcast. East gable end is roughcast. Late C18 style sash windows, On the South are casement windows and the first floor is stuccoed over a rubble ground floor. Adjoining it on the West is a three-storeyed red brick house with a Welsh slate roof, being once 7 St Helen's Passage, now incorporated as part of No 5 Bath Place. Photograph
  • 6 & 7 Bath Place (east side): 1369323
    Cottages, one building. Two-storeyed stucco. (?on timber framing). Brown tile roof. Central brick stack and another stack on the South gable end. C18 style sash windows. Small plain bracketed flat hoods to two doorways. Photograph

Planning applications in Bath Place

No. 1

  • In 1959 planning permission (59/08124/A_H) was granted to Merton College for internal alterations to form a bathroom

No. 2

  • In 1951 planning permission (51/01826/A_H) was granted to Merton College for the formation of a bathroom.

No. 3

  • In 1971 planning permission (71/24433/A_H) was granted to Merton College for the demolition of outhouses and chimney stack and the formation of bathroom, lavatory, and kitchen plus the installation of two new windows.

Nos. 4 & 5

  • In 1987 several planning applications were granted relating to the conversion of these houses into a hotel, including 87/01199/L to demolish the existing outbuilding and erect a two-storey building comprising hotel reception and toilets on ground floor and manager's flat on first floor

Nos. 6 & 7

  • In 1964 planning permission (64/15770/A_H) was granted to Merton College for an alteration to form a bathroom at 6 Bath Place
  • In 1963 planning permission (63/13399/A_H) was granted to Merton College for the conversion of a bedroom into a bathroom at 7 Bath Place
  • In 1984 retrospective planning permission (84/00300/L) was granted to W. Ellse to convert the two dwellings at 6 & 7 Bath Place into one.
  • In 1995 planning permission was granted to Whitbread Severn Inns (94/1702/NFH) to form links between the Turf Tavern and No. 7 Bath Place, and for the change of use of Nos. 6 & 7 Bath Place from dwelling to the pub kitchen on the ground floor and manager's flat on the first floor.

Bath Place, off Holywell Street, in the censuses

1841

Hard to identify

1851

No. 1: Susannah Hawkins (45), the wife of John Hawkins, the porter at Brasenose College, lived here with her sons John (12) and Oliver (9), and her niece Martha Bellard (14).

No. 2: Jane Godfrey (46), a widowed laundress, lived here with her seven children: Charles (23) was a tailor; Robert (21), William (19), Ebenezer (17), and Henry (15) were all college servants, and John (12) and Jane (9) were at school. They had an undergraduate lodger.

Back cottage No. 1: William Grainger (28), a widowed college servant, lived here with his widowed mother-in-law Susanna Tims (49), his brother-in-law William (17), who was also a college servant, and his sister-in-law Sarah Tims (10).

Back cottage No. 2: Joseph Ward (67), a porter to a wine merchant, lived here with his wife Sarah (52) and their servant.

Back cottage No. 3: Sarah Knibbs (77), a market gardener’s widow, lived here with her granddaughters Harriet and Fanny Knibbs, aged 17 and 15, who were also her servants.

1861

No. 1: William Price (43), a boot-closer, lived here with his wife Eliza (29) and his children Sylvia (10), Eliza (6), and Henry (2) A single lady, Elizabeth ?Boltarth (50) also lives with them: she is described as their daughter, but this is impossible.

No. 2: William Grainger (41), a college servant, lived here with his wife Eliza (30) and his children John (6), Emily (4), and Frederick (1). They had one house servant.

No. 3: Richard Swadling (43), a bookbinder finisher, lived here with his wife Mary Ann (40), who was a dress and mantle maker, and his children Frederick (15), Mary Anne (10), Elizabeth (5), William (2). They had one house servant.

No. 4: Thomas Preston (43), a servant of New College, lived here with his wife Sarah (41) and his children Charlotte (12), Sarah (11), Martha (10), Thomas (8), and Ada (2).

No. 5: Edward Stanton (41), a college servant, lived here with his wife Sarah (36).

1871

There seems to be some switching of numbers here, as the man who lived at No. 1 lived at No. 2 ten years earlier, while the man who lived at No. 2 lived at No. 1 ten years later

No. 1: William Granger (49), a college servant, lived here with his wife Eliza (41) and their children Emily (14), Frederick (11), Lucy (9), Mary (6), and Ada (1). They had one servant.

No. 2: William Bunce (51), a cordwainer, lived here with his wife Charlotte (52) and their children William (23), who was a compositor, John (21), who was a porter, Arthur (18), who was a photographer's assistant, Alice (15), who was a domestic servant, and Susan (13).

No. 3: Sydney Hamshaw (44), a college cook, lived here with his wife Mary Ann (40) and their children Sydney (17) Fanny (14), and Caroline (12).

No. 4: Robert Godfrey (40), a servant, lived here with his wife Jane (23) and their sons Isaac (5), Robert (3), and William (eight months).

No. 5: Thomas Boulton (43), an agent, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (43) and their children Elizabeth (12), Frederick (10), Kate (5), Thomas (3), and Florence (1).

1881

The house listed as No. 6 could have been the one numbered 4 in the previous census

No. 1: William Bunce (61), a master bootmaker, lived here with his wife Charlotte (64) and his two unmarried daughters: Charlotte (30), who was a needlewoman, and Susan (23), who was a machinist.

No. 2: George Hanniss (32), a college bedmaker, lived here with his wife Catherine (27) and his niece Caroline Stockwell (13)

No. 3: William Grainger (59), a college bedmaker, lived here with his wife Eliza (50) and his children Emily (24), a governess, Lucy (19), Mary (16), Ada (12), and Percival (6). They had an undergraduate lodging with them.

Nos 4 & 5: Not listed

No. 6: Robert Godfrey (50), a college bedmaker, lived here with his wife Jane (31) and his children Jessie (14), William (10), Alfred (7), Leonard (2), and Ethel (2).

No. 7: Frederick Sammons (69), a shoemaker, lived here with his wife Mary (65) and his son William (22).

1891

No. 1: Charles Henry Harman (52), a clothes cleaner, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (46) and their children Elizabeth (18), who was a parlourmaid, Rose (13), who was a book sewer, and Henry (11).

No. 2: Not listed.

No. 3: William Grainger (70), a retired college servant, lived here with his wife Eliza (61) and their children Ada (21) and Percival (16). They had a lodger, James Ernest Marsh (30), who is listed separately in the census: he was a Demonstrator in Chemistry.

Nos. 4 & 5: Not listed.

No. 6: Thomas Ody (29), a coachman, lived here with his wife Polly (34) and their daughter Hilda (5), plus their lodger.

No. 7: John Bunce (40), a painter, lived here with his wife Jane (37) and their children Edith (11), George (9), and Alfred (4).

1901

No. 1: Charles Harman (63), a clothes cleaner who worked from home, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (56) and his three grown-up children: Lily (26) was a machinist of underclothing; Rosa (23) was a book folder; and Henry (21) worked with his father as a clothes cleaner.

No, 2: John G. Walklett (41), a house decorator, lived here with his wife Mary (41) and his children Francis (14), Elsie (10), Olive (7), and Marjorie (3).

No. 3: George Greening (61), a domestic coachman, lived here with his wife Emma (64), his daughter Evelyn (24), and his grandson Cyril (8).

No. 4: Listed as not in occupation.

No. 5: Thomas Hunt (64), a retired corn chandler, lived here with his wife Matilda (53) and his son Thomas (21), who was an undergraduate.

No. 6: George Beetles (44), a domestic coachman, lived here with his wife Emma (39).

No., 7: Arthur Joyce (33), a postal letter carrier, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (32) and his children Arthur (8), Albert (6), Ethel (3), and Alice (under 1 month), and his sister-in-law Emma Fenemore (13).

1911

No. 1: Henry Harman (31), a clothes cleaner, lived here with his wife Mary Ann (25)

No. 2: Alice Emily Butler (37) was looking after this “lodging house”.

No. 3: Walter Herbert Luker (28), a single college servant, lived here with his two unmarried sisters: Minnie Florence (26) acted as his housekeeper, and Violet Beatrice (21) worked as a barmaid.

No. 4 & 5: No listing

No. 6: Henry Mott (48), a house painter, lived here with his wife Frances (41) and their children Henry (10), Alfred (6), and Eveline (2).

No. 7: Arthur James Joyce (42), a postman, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (41) and his children Albert (16), Ethel (13), Alice (10), and Harold (3).

Some occupants of Bath Place, Holywell Street listed in directories etc.

Year

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

               

1841–
1846

Houses not given numbers, but the following are listed in Bath Place, Holywell Street:
George Nunney, bricklayer
Joseph Sandell, boys school

1899

Charles Henry Harman

(clothes cleaner in 1914)

Frederick William Franklin

George Greening

Charles Brooks
Lodging house

(with No. 2 in 1914)

Godfrey William Price Jones
Insurance agent

John Jenkins

Arthur James Joyce

1914

See No. 4

Isaac Luker
(to 1930)

 

 

His daughter
Miss Violet Luker
(1935–70)

(with Michael Walker in 1966 only)

 

 

John Walklett

1930

Bert Clark

Bertie Clark by 1945

Thomas E. Richardson

John Walklett
Lodging house (1930)

Miss Olive Walklett
Lodging house (1935)

Miss Olive Walker's lodging house was
just at No. 4
in 1936 & 1941,
with
Miss E.M. Walklett's
lodging house
at No. 5

Frank McKenna

Francis McKenna by 1941

 

Mrs F. McKenna from 1964

Mrs Wiles

1935
1936

Tom Gibbs

Mrs Gibbs
by 1941

Thomas Akers

1941

No listing

1943
1945

John Joseph Butler

1945
1949

Thomas E. Ellis

1952–
1958

Mrs Davidson

1958

No listing

Mrs M. C. Barnes
Lodging House

1960

1962

Mrs B. M. Cawte

1964

K. Whiteley

Miss A. Congdon

1966

Cockcroft

Kenneth Ellworthy

R. A. Ellse

No listing

1967–
1968

No listing

David M. Holmes

No listing

1970

No listing

Alan W. Johnston

1972

Hugh Crago

R. M. Courakis

No listing

1973

Julian Leslie

Bernard Hurley

1976

Jeremy E. Cook

Timothy M. Cox

Now

     

Bath Place Hotel
(since 1988)

Part of Turf Tavern
(since 1995)

 

Holywell home

© Stephanie Jenkins

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