LONG WALL STREET, OXFORD

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9, 10, 11 & 12 Long Wall Street


9-12 Holywell Street

Nos. 9–12 Long Wall Street form one building. They are described in a lease of 1812 as being “lately erected”, but Historic England states that they are probably late seventeenth-century in core and refashioned in the mid-eighteenth century.

The four houses in the block are jointly Grade II listed (List Entry No. 1047216). The windows date from the eighteenth century: those on the ground floor have shutters, and those on the first floor have iron window-box balconies.

These houses belonged to the City of Oxford until 1921, when they became the property of New College via an exchange.

Historic view of 9–12 Long Wall Street

On 1 July 1812 the City granted a lease to the Headington carpenter William Jeffcoat of “seven messuages, lately erected”, being this group of four houses and Nos. 13–15 to the north. In 1825 and 1839 he was granted further leases, and the occupants were then as follows:

 
Lease of 1825
Lease of 1839

No. 9

Richard Hedges

John Hart

No. 10

George Hill

William Gunstone

No. 11

Thomas Sammons

Richard Cartwright

No. 12

Richard Osman

James Blake

Jackson’s Oxford Journal for 1 July 1865 reports that Charles Fisher senior had died on 27 June at the age of 84 “at his lodgings, 12 Longwall Street”.

On 6 April 1895 the following report about the poor state of these four houses, which then still belonged to the City, appeared in Jackson’s Oxford Journal:

LONG WALL STREET PROPERTY
    The special committee appointed with reference to this matter reported that they had very carefully considered the question of dealing with it, and were of opinion that it was undesirable to enter upon any scheme for the permanent development of the site until the whole of the existing leases have expired, and recommend that the Estates Surveyor prepare plans for the erection of sculleries at the back of the houses Nos. 9, 10, 11, and 12, at a cost not exceeding 200l.
    The report was agreed to, after a protest by Mr. C. UNDERHILL against throwing 200l. away upon this property, considering the bad state in which the property was, and the fact that the houses would have to come down in a few years.
    Ald. GRAY pointed out that the repair of the houses was included in the outlay.

Various repairs were done over the years, especially to the outbuildings behind, and in 1894 the City decided it would be better off without these four houses. The council’s General Purposes Committee considered demolishing the four houses and taking in an agreed 25 feet of frontage (i.e. the site of Bodicote House) from Mr Horn next door and building anew, but decided that an exchange with New College for property in Cornmarket and Queen Street was a better option; but this deal fell through, and the city continued its piecemeal repairs to the backs of the houses.

An exchange eventually took place in 1921, and these four houses are now an annexe of New College.

Occupants of 9, 10, 11, & 12 Long Wall Street listed in directories etc.

 

No. 9

No. 10

No. 11

No. 12

1846

Thomas Masslen
Bath proprietor and college servant

Matilda Betteris
Milliner

William Cross
College servant
(1846–1851)

Mrs Cross (1861)

Richard Piere Blake

1851

Samuel Bailey
College servant
(died here on 13 April 1869)

John Bossom
Porter of Brasenose College

1861

Miss Walton

Joseph Dubber

1866

Edward Bellamy

Julian Drummond
Portrait painter and Lodging house

 

Miss Bolland

1871

Charles Godfrey

Frederick Hastings

Charles Mansell (1871)

Mrs Charles E. Mansell (Matilda)
(1891, 1901, and 1911)

Listed as unoccupied in 1881 census

Registry Office for Servants (1889)

University lodging house (1899)

1881

D. Andrews

John Durran
Retired ironmonger

1889–1891

Mrs Sarah Davis
Lodging house

Edward Hine
Lodging house

1899

Wilson Frederick Bateman
University lodging house

Mrs Bateman by 1947

1911

Mrs Barnes
University lodging house

1914

Mrs Larner
University lodging house

1928–1936

Mrs Shillingford

Miss Smith

 

1947

Francis A.R. Mortimer

1954–1956

Miss L.E. Nash

1956–1958

Percival C. Harvey

1960

No listing

1962

Mrs E. Hancock

Christopher Wheway

1964

Mrs D. Lewis

1966–1967

1972–1973

Alan Ryan

No listing

1976

Miss L. E. Nash

Charles J. Williams

At 9–12 Long Wall Street today

New College annexe

9, 10, 11, & 12 Long Wall Street in the censuses

1841

The 1841 census does not give house numbers, but it is possible to give a tentative assignment based on census order and known inhabitants

No. 9 James Dawson (50), a college servant, appears to have lived here with Rebecca (35) and Elizabeth (14) and Jane (3). They had one servant.

No. 10
William Gunstone (35), a college servant, appears to have lived here with Eliza (35) and William (8), Harriet (6), Eliza (2),and Richard (8 months). They had one servant.

No. 11
Richard Cartwright (40), an upholsterer, appears to have lived here with Matilda (35) and Richard (15), Frederick (14), Henry (11), Francis (9), and Charles (6). They had one servant.

No. 12
Richard Blake (40), a college servant, appears to have lived here with Mary (40) and an independent gentleman Edward Chapman (20). They had one servant.

1851

No. 9
Thomas Maslen
(36), a college servant, lived here with his wife Eliza (42) and their son George (3). They had a lodger and one servant girl.

No. 10
Samuel Bailey (41), a college servant, lived here with his wife Elizabeth (32) and his children Elizabeth (16), Henry (14), Joseph (11). They had one male and one female servant, a a gentleman lodger.

No. 11
William Cross (56), a college servant, lived here with his wife Patience (45) and his daughter Emily (8). They had a 17-year-old servant girl.

No. 12
John Bossom (54), the Porter of Brasenose College, lived here with his wife Lucy (47) and his children Lucy Victoria (10) and Celici (7). His wife’s unmarried brother, Levi Nicholls (46), who was a coach-trimmer, also lived with them, and they had a 15-year-old servant girl.

1861

No. 9
Emily F. Walton
, an independent London-born spinster of 37, lived here.

No. 10
Samuel Bailey, a Cumnor-born college servant, lived here with his wife Elizabeth and children James (12), John (9), and Frank (7). The family had a 17-year-old servant girl.

No. 11
Patience Cross (59), a widowed laundress, lived here with her milliner daughter Emily (17). They had an undergraduate lodger and a 14-year-old servant girl.

No. 12
Unoccupied.

1871

No. 9
Charles Godfrey
(43), a college servant, lived here with his wife Caroline (48) and his niece Annie Jones (12). They had one servant.

No. 10
Frederick Hastings (29), a college servant, lived here with his wife Mary (29) and their children Frederick (4), Alice (2), and Amelia (7 months). They had one servant.

No. 11
Julian Drummond (41), a portrait painter, lived here with his wife Mary (35) and his son Julian (5). They had one servant.

No. 12
Charles Mansell (29), a printer, lived here with his wife Matilda (28) and his daughter Kate (3). They had one servant.

1881

No. 9
Daniel Andrews (34), a college gate porter, lived here with his wife Maria (33) and his children Ada Jane (9), Annie (7), Henry (3), and Frederick (1). They had one servant.

No. 10
John Durran (45), a retired ironmonger, lived here with his wife Martha (55).
As a separate household at No. 10, Job Durran (59), a cab proprietor, lived with his wife Ellen (47).

No. 11
Julian Drummond (53), a portrait painter, still lived here with his wife Mary (45) and his children Julian (15) and Philip (9). They had one servant.

No. 12
Unoccupied.

1891

No. 9
Daniel Andrews
(44), a college porter, still lived here with his wife Maria (44) and his children Ada (19), Henry (13), Frederick (11), Albert (7), Percy 94), and Reginald (2).

No. 10
Sarah Davis (60), a widowed lodging house keeper lived here with her daughter Kate (20) and one boarder (a student of theology).

No. 11
Edward Hine (39), a tailor, lived here with his German wife Christina (39) and their children Efa (7), Hubert (6), Elise (3), and Rudolph (21), as well as his niece Adele Hine (16).

No. 12
Matilda Mansell (47), a widowed lodging house keeper, lived here with her daughter Kate (23).

1901

No. 9
Wilson F. Bateman
(36), an organ builder, lived here with his wife Ellen (37).

No. 10
Sarah Davis (68), a widowed lodging house keeper, still lived here with a lodger, Mrs Catherine Cole (49).

No. 11
Edward Hine (49), a tailor, still lived here with his German wife Christina (49) and his children Christina (17), Herbert (16), Elie (13), and Ferdinand (12).

No. 12
Matilda Mansell (57), a lodging house keeper, still lived here with one servant.

1911

No. 9
Wilson F. Bateman
(46), an organ builder, still lived here with his wife Ellen (47) and his niece Elsie Nash (9).

No. 10
Jane Barnes (47), a widowed lodging-house keeper, lived here with her married sister Maria Lardner (5). They had one servant

No. 11
Edward Hine (59), a tailor, lived here with his German wife Christine (59) and his daughter Elise (23).

No. 12
Matilda Mansell (65), a widowed lodging-house keeper, now lived here with her married daughter Katie Alden (43) and two servants.

Long Wall home

© Stephanie Jenkins

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